Tags: mining

Abuses by mining companies are not new in the Philippines. Destructive mining have, for decades and in tandem with wanton logging and the equally destructive building of dams, destroyed and poisoned whole communities. Mining companies have been shortchanging these communities. Worse, these firms have been using the police, the military and paramilitary units as their security guards, leading to human-rights abuses such as those suffered by the Ifugaos in Nueva Vizcaya.

By ANNE MARXZE D. UMIL
The results of two environmental investigative missions belie the declaration of President Benigno Aquino III that local communities would decide whether to allow mining operations in their area or not. In South Cotabato, Aquino was reported to have mediated to reverse the decision of the local government disallowing mining in their jurisdiction.

By MARYA SALAMAT
Forming his team to set the direction of change or political payback? So far, except for Justice Sec. Leila de Lima, the Cabinet of Pres. Benigno Aquino III is a mixture of key figures in his campaign, representatives of big business, and old hands of the former Arroyo administration.

By JANESS ANN J. ELLAO
For the farmers, peasants and indigenous peoples of Southern Mindanao, the past several years had been a period of great danger and violence as big mining companies encroach into ancestral and agricultural land, using the military to drive them away. Many peasant and Lumad leaders who opposed these projects have ended up dead and tortured.

By ARTHUR L. ALLAD-IW Northern Dispatch Posted by (Bulatlat.com) BAGUIO CITY (246 kms north of Manila) – A London-based company and its Filipino partner will buy 80 percent of Atok-Big Wedge Company, which would push for the reactivation of the latter’s mining operation after a few years of inactivity in the mining industry. The London-based…

By ALEXANDER MARTIN REMOLLINO
Far from a counter-insurgency operation, the massive militarization and dislocation of communities in Surigao del Sur and the Caraga region had more to do with protecting business interests, primarily mining and energy investments. Although there is nothing particularly new in all this, the Arroyo regime had actually taken the extra step to ensure that the military would act as veritable security guards of these companies.